Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription or Fee Access

Bone Fracture Sensing and Acoustic Data Communication

JOCHEN MOLL, MIT B. BHAVSAR, CHRISTIAN KEXEL, JOHN H. BARKER

Abstract


Approximately 12-15 million fractures occurred from 1998 to 2010 only in USA costing an estimated $23.4 billion on the healthcare system. Accurately monitoring the progression of fracture healing is essential to be able to advise patients when it is safe to return to normal activity. The most common method used to diagnose fractures and monitor healing is by radiographic imaging and evaluation of patient’s function. This paper presents the proof-of-concept of an electromechanical impedance (EMI) spectroscopy-based “fracture-sensing” system fixed to a standard orthopedic screw and equipped with acoustic data communication that transmits fracture measurements to an external acoustic receiver. The concept is tested in an ex vivo pig limb at room temperature with the piezoelectric transducer fixed to a standard orthopedic screw and the acoustic receiver located externally on the skin surface. EMI measurements are recorded and processed in the frequency range from 40kHz to 500kHz. Acoustic data communication using on-off keying in time-domain is studied for distinct frequencies from 40kHz to 300kHz. The results demonstrate simultaneous bone structural sensing and acoustic data communication by means of the same sensor technology.


DOI
10.12783/shm2019/32154

Full Text:

PDF